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7

A. Personal introduction

 

The fascination of New Guinea - the Last Unknown.

My journey to Australia and New Guinea half a centrury ago. Visit to Sir Edward Hallstrom and „his“ dogs at Taronga Park Zoo of Sydney.

Travelling twenty times (from 1959 to 2003) into the wilderness of New Guinea: to the Central Highlands and the Papuan Gulf District – discoveries of ancient strains of New Guinea village dogs.

This publications presents the first comprehensive survey of Papuan dogs.

B. Scientific introduction

Troughton's description of Canis hallstromi from the highlands of New Guinea – the so

called „New Guinea Singing Dog“.

The actual scientific status of Papuan dogs: wild or feral ?

C. About strains and breeds

A dynamic definition of dog breeds. Reference to Lawrence Alderson.

Pariah dogs. What are „primitive dogs“ ? References to Eberhard Trumler's research.

The NGSD breed is separated from traditionally kept Papuan dogs.

D. Early migrations to New Guinea and Australia

South-east Asian dogs: their origin and differenciation.

The zoo-geographical isolation of New Guinea and the Australian continent.

Migrations of humans, dogs and pigs from the Asian mainland – first to New Guinea and from there to Australia.

The evolution of the Dingo.

E. Adaptation and differentiation of dogs on New Guinea

The criteria for evolution of native breeds on the New Guinea island continent.

The role of ecological and cultural factors.

Early traces of dog husbandry (archaeological evidence).

The so far undefined strain of the coastal zone (e.g. in the Papuan Gulf, the Raja Ampat Archipelago) and the newly discovered strain of the foothills inland (the Mt. Bosavi region) and the Southern Highlands District.

Their relations to the Australian Dingo.

The Fraser Island Dingo link-population.

F. Our experiences with Individual Papuan dogs

"Sóbi" and "Nérumu" in the field and at home in Germany. Observations of their behaviour, various anecdotes.

G. Traditional dog husbandry in selected regions of New Guinea

The use of dogs in game hunting.

Eating of dog meat.

Dog teeth as ornaments. Customs related to the collecting of dog teeth. Barter trade.

The attachment and status of dogs in Papuan village society: integration and affection.

H. Mythology and folk-tales about dogs in selected Papuan tribes

Collected from early travel books and ethnographical literature.

I. Preservation of strains - but how?

The endangered status of Papuan dog strains

Their near extinction and measures for their preservation.

Footnotes (F...separate article)

Research papers (Bibliography...in the same separate article)

In the conception of early human civilization there existed nothing supernatural because the spiritual dimension was an essential part of the natural world. Hence holiness, if defined as the essence of the natural, existed before mankind began to recognize and to distinguish the qualities of the spiritual versus the natural world. So it remains a matter of definition if holiness (or sacredness) should be regarded as a quality per se or of human making.

If we were trying to reflect upon the initial stages in the relationship between small-size („tribal“) societies and their natural environment we got to retreat to places that remained unaffected by ideologies and ways of life opposed to the understanding of holy or spiritual being universal - and not just distinct attributes of mankind.

The island which now bears the name of Kyra Panagia had remained such virgin place; it retained the very holyness that has no human history: a sanctuary of the all-natural and all-spiritual in a timeless synthesis.

People must have lived in the realm of this archipelago since the dawn of mankind (cf. the article about Gioura). ...weiterlesen "Kyra Panagia – the Holy Island"

A pictorial record of Melanesian architectural diversity, part one


Region: Southern New Guinea, Gulf of Papua.

Location: Village Tutugu, inland of Kerewo ethnic district, Kikori River.

Photographs taken 1966.

Bilder

Location: Paia'a village, Kerewo ethnic district , Omati River.

Photographs taken 1959.

1

In continuation of  "Bosavi - Living portraits from the forest".

All photographs were taken 1966 at Didessa village, Kaluli ethnic group, Mt. Bosavi region, Papua New Guinea

Note: not all these people lived at Didessa, though. Some had come from distant villages to meet us.

The "village" consisted of one communal dwelling only. ...weiterlesen "Bosavi images – part 2"

Never ever in the evolution of human life on Earth there will be again communities like the Bosavi forest people at the time of our visit in 1966 - being totally independent of our civilization.

Never ever again there will exist any tribal cultures in their own right.

Our generation is experiencing the final and dramatic change from distinct ethnic diversity and traditional maintenance of endemic ways of life, towards a global conformity, inter-relationship and inter – dependence. This stage of human evolution never happened in any comparable way before nor can it be repeated. We witness an unique transition. ...weiterlesen "Bosavi – living portraits from the forest"